User Expectations in a World of Smart Devices

User Expectations in a World of Smart Devices

This, in turn, raises several questions for experience designers:
Under what circumstances do people trust or mistrust objects? Do the walls really have ears? If I sit on that park bench, will it tell my student loan officer how much money is in my pocket?
What kinds of communication between objects are appropriate, acceptable, or desired? I want my sandals to tell my fridge if I’ve walked off last night’s pizza so that I know whether to have a salad or a sandwich for lunch. However, it may not be desirable for them to report my whereabouts to every poster I pass on the street. Thus, designing for systems of objects will be very different than merely designing for object interoperability.
What functions will naturally cluster to form new kinds of common objects? Cameras and phones have already begun to merge with each other and with instant messaging clients, but their integration with electronic notepads (in the form of PDAs) seems a bit more dubious.
How will design communicate the functionality of objects? As we move from general-purpose smart devices to ones that solve specific problems, how will devices tell us what they do? The Nikon Coolpix digital camera announced through its split and twistable camera body that it was a very different kind of camera than the film cameras the company had made before, even though the device was entirely conventional otherwise.
How will object intelligence play in terms of the desirability of objects? Industrial design has been very busy the last couple of years giving everyday objects “personality” through appearance. What happens when they can actually mimic personality itself? Where is the line between cute and cloying (for a given target audience, of course)?

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